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ARTICLES IN THE BOOK

  1. Alligator
  2. Alpaca
  3. Anaconda
  4. Ant
  5. Anteater
  6. Antelope
  7. Baboon
  8. Badger
  9. Bat
  10. Bear
  11. Bee
  12. Boa
  13. Butterfly
  14. Camel
  15. Canary
  16. Cat
  17. Cheeta
  18. Chicken
  19. Chimpanzee
  20. Cobra
  21. Cod
  22. Condor
  23. Cormorant
  24. Cow
  25. Crab
  26. Cricket
  27. Crocodile
  28. Crow
  29. Deer
  30. Dog
  31. Dolphin
  32. Donkey
  33. Dove
  34. Duck
  35. Eagle
  36. Elephant
  37. Emu
  38. Falcon
  39. Ferret
  40. Fly
  41. Fox
  42. Gazelle
  43. Giraffe
  44. Goat
  45. Goose
  46. Gorilla
  47. Hare
  48. Hedgehog
  49. Heron
  50. Hippopotamus
  51. Horse
  52. Hyena
  53. Ibis
  54. Jackal
  55. Kangaroo
  56. Kingfisher
  57. Koala
  58. Leopard
  59. Lion
  60. Llama
  61. Lobster
  62. Louse
  63. Mantodea
  64. Mink
  65. Mole
  66. Mongoose
  67. Mosquito
  68. Mule
  69. Nightingale
  70. Octopus
  71. Opossum
  72. Orangutan
  73. Ostrich
  74. Otter
  75. Owl
  76. Panda
  77. Parrot
  78. Partridge
  79. Peacock (Peafowl)
  80. Pelican
  81. Penguin
  82. Pheasant
  83. Pig
  84. Pigeon
  85. Prawn
  86. Puffin
  87. Quail
  88. Rabbit
  89. Reindeer
  90. Rhinoceros
  91. Salmon
  92. Seagull
  93. Seal
  94. Shark
  95. Sheep
  96. Shrimp
  97. Silk worm
  98. Skunk
  99. Sparrow
  100. Spider
  101. Squid
  102. Squirrel
  103. Stork
  104. Swallow
  105. Swan
  106. Tarantula
  107. Termite
  108. Tiger
  109. Toucan
  110. Tuna
  111. Turkey
  112. Turtle
  113. Violet-ear
  114. Vulture
  115. Walrus
  116. Wasp
  117. Whale
  118. Wolf
  119. Woodpecker
  120. Yak
  121. Zebra
 



ANIMALS
This article is from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hare

All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_the_GNU_Free_Documentation_License 

Hare

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Hares and jackrabbits are leporids belonging to the genus Lepus. (Four other species of leporid in the genera Caprolagus and Pronolagus are also called "hares".) Very young hares are called leverets.

They are very fast moving. The European Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus) can run at speeds of up to 70 km/h (45 mi/h). Hares live solitarily or in pairs.

A common type of hare in arctic North America is the Snowshoe Hare, replaced further south by the Black-tailed Jackrabbit, White-tailed Jackrabbit and other species.

Normally a shy animal, the European Brown Hare changes its behaviour in spring, when hares can be seen in broad daylight chasing one another around meadows; this appears to be competition between males to attain dominance (and hence more access to breeding females). During this spring frenzy, hares can be seen "boxing"; one hare striking another with its paws. For a long time it had been thought that this was more inter-male competition, but closer observation has revealed that it is usually a female hitting a male; either to show that she is not yet quite ready to mate, or as a test of his determination.

Hares do not bear their young below ground in a burrow as do other Leporidae, but rather in a shallow depression or flattened nest of grass called a form. Young hares are adapted to the lack of physical protection offered by a burrow by being born fully furred and with eyes open. They are hence able to fend for themselves very quickly after birth, that is to say they are precocial. By contrast, the related rabbits and cottontail rabbits are altricial, having young that are born blind and hairless.

The hare's diet is very similar to that of the rabbit.

Classification

  • Genus Lepus
    • Subgenus Macrotolagus
      • Antelope Jackrabbit, Lepus alleni
    • Subgenus Poecilolagus
      • Snowshoe Hare, Lepus americanus
    • Subgenus Lepus
      • Arctic Hare, Lepus arcticus
      • Alaskan Hare, Lepus othus
      • Mountain Hare, Lepus timidus
    • Subgenus Proeulagus
      • Black-tailed Jackrabbit, Lepus californicus
      • White-sided Jackrabbit, Lepus callotis
      • Cape Hare, Lepus capensis
      • Tehuantepec Jackrabbit, Lepus flavigularis
      • Black Jackrabbit, Lepus insularis
      • Scrub Hare, Lepus saxatilis
      • Desert Hare, Lepus tibetanus
      • Tolai Hare, Lepus tolai
    • Subgenus Eulagos
      • Broom Hare, Lepus castroviejoi
      • Yunnan Hare, Lepus comus
      • Korean Hare, Lepus coreanus
      • Corsican Hare, Lepus corsicanus
      • European Hare, Lepus europaeus
      • Granada Hare, Lepus granatensis
      • Manchurian Hare, Lepus mandschuricus
      • Woolly Hare, Lepus oiostolus
      • Ethiopian Highland Hare, Lepus starcki
      • White-tailed Jackrabbit, Lepus townsendii
    • Subgenus Sabanalagus
      • Ethiopian Hare, Lepus fagani
      • African Savanna Hare, Lepus microtis
    • Subgenus Indolagus
      • Hainan Hare, Lepus hainanus
      • Indian Hare, Lepus nigricollis
      • Burmese Hare, Lepus peguensis
    • Subgenus Sinolagus
      • Chinese Hare, Lepus sinensis
    • Subgenus Tarimolagus
      • Yarkand Hare, Lepus yarkandensis
    • Subgenus incertae sedis
      • Japanese Hare, Lepus brachyurus
      • Abyssinian Hare, Lepus habessinicus

Folklore and Mythology

"How to allure the Hare". Facsimile of a Miniature in the Manuscript of Phoebus (Fifteenth Century).
Enlarge
"How to allure the Hare". Facsimile of a Miniature in the Manuscript of Phoebus (Fifteenth Century).

The hare in African folk tales is a trickster: some of the stories about the hare were retold among African slaves in America, and are the basis of the Brer Rabbit stories. The hare appears in English folklore in the saying "as mad as a March hare".

Many cultures, including the Indian and Japanese, see a hare in the pattern of dark patches in the moon (see Man in the Moon). The constellation Lepus represents a hare. There is evidence to suggest that there was some sort of taboo regarding hares in the Proto-Indo-European culture; this is especially notable due to the likelihood that the common word for hare, *kasos, which literally means "the grey one", was a euphemism for a previous and now lost word for hare.[citation needed]

Famous Hares

  • Peppy Hare from the Star Fox series of video games
  • Jack Hare, central character in Kit Williams' treasure hunt book Masquerade
  • Bucky O'Hare
  • Jazz Jackrabbit
  • Hare from Monster Rancher
  • Hartley Hare from Pipkins
  • Mad March Hare from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
  • Hare Jordan, Bugs Bunny's alter-ego in a Nike advertisement campaign alongside Michael Jordan.
  • Night of the Lepus features a number of murderous hares.
  • Two hares travelled with The Animals of Farthing Wood
  • The hare in the fable The Tortoise and the Hare, attributed to Aesop
  • A large number of hares appear in the Redwall series of books and are almost always militaristic, particularly those from Salamandastron, and have an affected speech pattern.

The Three Hares

Main article: Three hares

Recent (2004) research has followed the history and migration of a symbolic image of three hares with conjoined ears. In this image, three hares are seen chasing each other in a circle with their heads near its centre. While each of the animals appears to have two ears, only three ears are depicted. The ears form a triangle at the centre of the circle and each is shared by two of the hares. The image has been traced from Christian churches in the English county of Devon right back along the Silk Road to China, via Western and Eastern Europe and the Middle East. It is possible that even before its appearance in China it was actually first depicted in the Middle East before being re-imported centuries later. Its use has been found associated with Christian, Jewish, Islamic and Buddhist sites stretching back to about 600 CE.

External link: The Three Hares Project

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Rabbit
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hare"

 



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